• Subiect: „In an attempt to improve mainstream etymological propositions that regard the origin of the Romanian word pungă ‘purse’ and of several cognates of it, the author of the present article resorts to evidence provided by archaeology, history, ethnography and linguistics, from the perspective of the “words-and-things” method. First taken into consideration are the purse of Ötzi (the Copper-Age “Iceman”) and the purses of Iron-Age “Bog People” discovered in Denmark. As for linguistics, a starting point is represented by the fourth-century attestation of the Gothic term puggs in Wulfila’s Bible (Luke 10, 4). Whereas earlier etymologists (notably Meyer-Lübke) considered that Romance a-ended nouns (ultimately derived from Gothic), such as Romanian pungă, Italian ponga and Sardinian punga, could reach thoselanguages only via Middle Greek, this author argues that such a “detour” needs not be imagined. First of all, Gothic itself provides sufficient examples of doublets made of variants of masculine nouns ending in either -(u)s or -a. Therefore, a Gothic *pugga – that is, *punga (as variant of puggs) – could be borrowed into Vulgar Latin as early as the 4th century CE. As for semantics, worth mentioning is the striking correspondence between the main meanings of today’s Danish/Swedish pung (‘purse for carrying money’, ‘scrotum’) and exactly the same meanings shown by today’s Daco-Romanian/Macedo-Romanian pungă. The main conclusion of the article is that a Gothic *punga could have been borrowed into the Vulgar Latin (or the Early Romance) spoken in Central-Southeast Europe in the context of the earliest contacts between the Goths and the Roman Empire.”
  • Limba de redactare: română
  • Vezi publicația: Acta Musei Tutovensis
  • Editura: Demiurg
  • Loc publicare: Bârlad
  • Anul publicaţiei: 2020
  • Referinţă bibliografică pentru nr. revistă: XVI; anul 2020; seria Istorie veche şi arheologie
  • Paginaţia: 145-157
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