• Subiect: „The Gothic word hlaiw, which represents the central element of this article, was first recorded in the 4th century, in the Wulfila’s Gothic Bible. According to Köbler’s etymological dictionary of the Gothic language, hlaiw meant ‘tomb, burial cave, sepulchre, grave’. As the word under discussion had cognates in several Old Germanic languages, linguists were able to reconstruct a Proto-Germanic *hlaiwa, which presumably meant ‘funeral mound’, or also ‘mortuary house’. With the latter meaning, the word was borrowed into Proto-Slavic, where its form became *chlěvŭ, whose meanings, as recorded in Old Church Slavonic, were ‘house, shelter’. In its evolution, on the soil of various historical Slavic languages, the word came to have forms such as khlev, khliv, chlew, chliev, etc. Semantic degradation (due to perception through an “ironic filter”) appears to have affected those variants, most of which came to mean ‘stable’, or even ‘pigsty’. In the final part of the article, the present author points out that Romanian has a term hleab – with a variant hleamp, and with meanings such as ‘outbuilding, annex, shack’ – which can also be referred to Gothic hlaiw. The Romanian word does not appear to be as much affected by semantic degradation as the Slavic words derived from Proto-Slavic *chlěvŭ. Also, both hleab and its variant hleamp show – especially in their final sounds – phonetic changes that were specific to the transition from Vulgar Latin to “Primitive Romanian” (cf. Lat. ceruus > Rom. cerb, or Lat. strabus > Vulg. Lat. strambus > Rom. strâmb). Therefore, this author assumes that hleab/hleamp did not reach Romanian via Proto-Slavic, but it represents, rather, a borrowing of Gothic hlaiw into substratal idoioms such as those spoken by the “free Dacians” who lived side by side with the Visigoths in regions of today’s Moldavia (as proved by finds from sites such as Valea Seacă and Mihălăşeni). Or, even, Gothic hlaiw can have been borrowed into the Late Vulgar Latin spoken by fourth-fifth-century inhabitants of former Dacia Antiqua, where at least one major Transylvanian site, Sântana de Mureş, reveals penetration of Old Germanic elements from the vast area of the Černjakhov culture.”
  • Limba de redactare: română
  • Vezi publicația: Acta Musei Tutovensis
  • Editura: Demiurg
  • Loc publicare: Bârlad
  • Anul publicaţiei: 2018
  • Referinţă bibliografică pentru nr. revistă: XIV; anul 2018; seria Istorie veche şi arheologie
  • Paginaţia: 165-176
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